Sunday, November 20, 2005

A Quaint Thought From a Time Long Before Manufacturing Consent Was Raised to Art Form

'Public sentiment is everything. With public sentiment, nothing can fail; without it, nothing can succeed. Consequently, he who molds public sentiment goes deeper than he who enacts statutes or pronounces decisions. He makes statutes and decisions possible or impossible to be executed.'
--Abraham Lincoln

6 Comments:

At 7:54 AM, Blogger The Full Cleveland said...

I think Abe would have had a blog.

 
At 9:52 AM, Blogger John Ettorre said...

Jim,
Man, could you imagine what that would be like? I'd put a second mortgage on my house to be able to read just a few of those postings. But what would he call it? My vote: "Musings From Beneath the Stovepipe Hat"..

 
At 3:19 PM, Anonymous Sarah said...

No. It would have been called "The Proverbial Coal Shovel," obvs.

 
At 5:05 PM, Blogger al said...

It looks great

 
At 9:35 AM, Blogger The Full Cleveland said...

Abe's blog would have likely been focused on living beyond our self-imposed limitations. So I imagine this theme would have been reflected in his blog's title. My vote: If only I had a mustache...

 
At 9:53 AM, Blogger John Ettorre said...

I love that old Abe still gets people talking and reflecting. I've always said that Abe and Einstein are the gifts that keep giving: even a century and a half and a half century, respectively, after their deaths, more books come out on (and sometimes even by) them than almost anyone still alive. There was just a book published recently on Einstein's letters to children; it sold briskly. And I've just purchased a great book on Lincoln's depression, which I'll be commenting on shortly. As some of my readers may recall, earlier this year I published a piece (alas, no longer online) in the Sunday Plain Dealer magazine about the visit of Lincoln's funeral train to Cleveland. It sparked more mail than anything I think I've ever written in 22 years. I'd love to take credit, but the truth is that people never tire of Honest Abe. And it helps that his life and his work embody what Working With Words is all about. He is, simply put, the author of our most important foundational civic scripture, edging out even Jefferson in my mind.

 

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